Execute a File

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EXECUTE A FILE

You don't have to type the full DOS command to execute a file. Instead, you may position the pointer next to the file that you want to execute, then press the F3 (Execute File) key. If the file is executable, (has an extension of .EXE, .COM or .BAT) the program will run and you will leave DM. When you are finished running the program, you will automatically return to DM exactly where you left off. (If the file is not executable, nothing will happen.)

This feature executes a file in the same manner as if you were in DOS. Position the pointer at an executable file. When you press F3, the filename appears in the Popup Help Window. Press the ENTER key to execute the file, or, if you wish, you may type more parameters onto the command line, such as a pathname or the name of the file to be loaded and run. Use standard DOS syntax if you type any additions to the command. For example, suppose you are marking files to be moved or copied to a disk in drive A and you realize you don't have a formatted disk to copy them to. To continue your project you must first format a disk in drive A. (The FORMAT program must be in the current directory on Drive C.) Place the pointer next to the FORMAT file, and press F3. The following message will appear:


             ___k Memory Available.
             Type Text Into Command Line.
             FORMAT _

You will have to type A: at the cursor to indicate that you want the disk in drive A formatted, then press ENTER. The line "___k Memory Available" tells you how much resident memory (RAM), in "k," is available to execute the file at the pointer. If the file you've picked is larger than the available memory, you can't execute it. The amount of memory available depends on what kind of computer you have. DM takes up about 100k of memory, so if your computer only has 128k of RAM, don't plan on being able to execute anything except the smallest of files. Computers with 256k may have some difficulty executing large files. Those with 512k or 640k shouldn't have any trouble at all.

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